The Hawthorne Effect

light-bulb

In 1924 General Electric preformed a study at a commissioned plant in Illinois.  Researchers told workers they were going to increase lighting in the production areas of the plant to determine if it would increase production.  It did.

 

Once again they increased the lighting and once more production increased. The researchers were ecstatic.  A third time, they increased the lighting and yet again production increased again.   GE was so happy.  They have cracked a code to increasing American production and found a way to infinitely increase light bulb sales.

 

For more get the eBook:

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11 thoughts on “The Hawthorne Effect

  1. Rajiv says:

    I agree with you. People, unless they are highly self-motivated, will always do better under supervision. Maybe I am a cynic, but I do believe that many people will tend to find a short wherever possible.
    I used to believe that this is an Indian characteristic, but I find that this is a global tendency

  2. tokealiyu says:

    Thank you once again for this great post.

    I teach productivity and this is a great insight!

    Fola Daniel Adelesi
    President/CEO,
    Edible Pen.

    My books are now available on http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/foladaniel Please go there to buy. Thank you!

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  3. This is true. Good oversight makes for excellent work. If as managers we learn to oversee without being overlords we will make excellent workers.everyone needs breathing room.

  4. Excellent post. As embarrassing as it was, sounds like that was a lesson learned that you never forgot!

  5. […] The Hawthorne Effect by Cranston Holden […]

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