Questions Drive Behavior

questions

When many people think of management they think of a person sitting behind a big oak desk shouting orders and demanding perfection.  Other people think of management as a person with the sole responsibility of standing behind you with a whip striking you in the back of the legs while ordering you to pull the cart faster and faster.

This is why the word management has become such a negative term and people gravitate more to the word leadership. A leader is one who grabs the reins of the cart first and begins to pull while simultaneously influencing others to do the same. Leadership is all well and good if you have that amount of time to work with a small group. Most of the time, you can’t pull that off. Your time is valuable and to be effective you have to be in more than one place and a time.

 

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11 thoughts on “Questions Drive Behavior

  1. This approach makes a lot of sense. Asking effective questions is more powerful than having the answers. Questions ask people to reflect, and learning takes place through reflection. Telling people what to do leaves them dependent, asking people what to do empowers them. Empowered people are more satisfied and engaged.

  2. That is a great way to deal with people, asking the questions would make them participate – and not go on the defensive.
    Excellent post!

  3. Rajiv says:

    Odd… This is the second time I have read about how questions can drive management/leadership behaviour. Yet, there is a dark side to questioning as well.

  4. Great advice Cranston… I like the idea of driving the behavior instead of pulling it out of employees

  5. […] Cranston Holden reflected on the idea that “Questions drive behavior.” […]

  6. […] Leaders’ Questions Drive Behavior  […]

  7. cegosasiapacific says:

    Great advice!

  8. […] Speaking of questions, Cranston Holden writes that “Questions Drive Behavior.” […]

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