Intent Centered Communication

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Conversations about standards not being met can be difficult.  The best way to find common ground is to focus on the good intent of the person you are talking to. Let that be the thematic goal of the conversation.

Assume the other person has noble intentions focus your conversations and purpose toward that cause.

I know your ultimate goal is to satisfy all of our customers in the most ethical and economical way possible. So there are a couple things I’ve seen that concern me that may have gone unnoticed. I hope we can realign them with that original intent.

As soon as you assume the other person doesn’t mean well, the conversation goes down hill rapidly. Intent Centered Communication :

  • stops finger pointing and defensiveness
  • refocuses of what is important and not petty
  • lowers resentment and backbiting
  • puts it all out on the table
  • assumes the other person is noble and not selfish
  • reduces silos

In difficult situations state what you believe to be their noble intent at the beginning and don’t just jump to a conclusion that they are incompetent, lazy, or selfish.

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4 thoughts on “Intent Centered Communication

  1. Ugh, I’ve been working on this, A LOT, with a co-worker that has had a couple rough months. His stress levels made having a conversation very difficult. I prayed, A LOT, over the communication issues that we were having and as a result, I’ve worked on a servants heart on my end, and to be more present in the conversation like you’ve mentioned above, and speaking and choosing my words with intention. It’s been a growth experience for me, because I’m used to just stating the facts (also known as just blurting it out) and that had become ineffective with this worker.

    Intent Centered Communication is a great way to help guide the other person to the solution in an environment that can make them feel safe. Great post!

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